Unintelligable Lyrics

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Unintelligable Lyrics

Postby philipdalton on March 27th, 2012, 9:02 pm

Why are so many song lyrics unintelligable or just difficult to understand? Michael Jackson's 'Don't Stop 'Til You Get Enough' says 'Keep on with the force don't,don't stop 'til you get enough'.
However,it seems to sound like 'Keep on with the **** stuff,don't stop 'til you get enough',or 'Keep on with the **** star,don't stop 'til you get enough'.
Another example is Bros's 'When Will I Be Famous' which is supposed to say 'When will I, will I be famous? I can't answer, I can't answer that' but instead sounds like 'When will I, will I be famous? I get anxious, I get intimate'
Can anybody else think of any amusing examples?
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Re: Unintelligable Lyrics

Postby tch on March 28th, 2012, 3:50 am

My all time favorite is Elton John's 'Tiny Dancer'.
Especially when he sings 'Hold me close now, Tony Danza'.
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Re: Unintelligable Lyrics

Postby philipdalton on March 28th, 2012, 3:55 pm

Funny you should say that, I used to think it was "Hold me close now, tie me down Sir"
His pronunciation isn't that good is it?
When you look up song lyrics on the Internet you're always in for one or two surprises aren't you?
It has been said that the words of rock 'n 'roll songs are usually pretty hard to hear, it's a characteristic of the genre.
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Re: Unintelligable Lyrics

Postby Graceful Leonard on March 28th, 2012, 10:08 pm

I remember years ago a friend had a Japanese import copy of the record Young Parisians by Adam and the Ants. Not only was it difficult to hear the exact lyrics, but whoever had done the translations back and forth obvious went on phonetics, rather than anything that made sense. The whole thing was amusing, but one line I remember:

Young Parisians are so French, they love Patti Smith

. . . was translated on the lyric sheet as

Young Parisians are so French, they love putty cement
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Re: Unintelligable Lyrics

Postby ThetaSigma on April 28th, 2012, 12:29 am

I find some Nirvana lyrics to be hard to understand even if I hear the words properly! But I just plow on. I am a fan. :D
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Re: Unintelligable Lyrics

Postby philipdalton on June 10th, 2012, 9:10 pm

I was watching a punk programme the other day with The Clash performing live on an old show called 'Something Else'. The whole song was almost completely unintelligable, I could hardly decipher one word coming from Joe Strummer's mouth for the life of me. And another thing, when I look at the lyrics of the song, 'Clash City Rockers', they seem to be a bit puerile and don't make much sense, which basically sums up punk rock music really.
I notice this particular genre of music isn't particularly popular these days either as no-one has sprung to its defence yet in a whole fortnight.
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Re: Unintelligable Lyrics

Postby Graceful Leonard on July 12th, 2012, 8:01 pm

philipdalton wrote:I notice this particular genre of music isn't particularly popular these days either as no-one has sprung to its defence yet in a whole fortnight.


It's important to remember that 'punk' is an extremely vague term. The elements that might be thought of as 'punk' encompass several different strands of music in different decades, and also several different artistic movements tied closely in with fashion, art, politics, and philosophy (such as the situationists, anarchists etc).

The music from the UK in the mid-to-late seventies, which is commonly called 'punk' in the popular media, was part of a period of enormous social upheaval. In many cases, its function was to give voice and means of expression to highly disaffected youth--their way of challenging an establishment and political system that gave them nothing at all. In many ways, the approach could be compared to artistic movements such as modernism, surrealism, dadaism in that it rejected and challenged conventional ideas.

It is a sad irony that The Clash are now being used to advertise British Airways; nevertheless, the UK 'punk' movement changed everything forever in this country, and its effects are still very much in evidence.
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Re: Unintelligable Lyrics

Postby philipdalton on July 15th, 2012, 7:37 pm

"The music from the UK in the mid-to-late seventies, which is commonly called 'punk' in the popular media, was part of a period of enormous social upheaval".
Music is said to belong to a particular genre because it has a distinctive sound to it. The Nolan Sisters, for instance, were from the UK in the mid-to-late seventies but no-one thought of them as a punk rock band simply because they didn't sound like one. However, many would probably refer to refer to modern music simply as 'pop music' rather than classify any particular band in any one of the various genres.
The Buzzcocks were considered to be a punk band but I would say they sounded more like a pop group, and some of the bands classified as part of the 'heavy metal' genre could be said not to sound very heavy.
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Re: Unintelligable Lyrics

Postby Graceful Leonard on July 15th, 2012, 8:13 pm

philipdalton wrote:"The music from the UK in the mid-to-late seventies, which is commonly called 'punk' in the popular media, was part of a period of enormous social upheaval".
Music is said to belong to a particular genre because it has a distinctive sound to it. The Nolan Sisters, for instance, were from the UK in the mid-to-late seventies but no-one thought of them as a punk rock band simply because they didn't sound like one. However, many would probably refer to refer to modern music simply as 'pop music' rather than classify any particular band in any one of the various genres.
The Buzzcocks were considered to be a punk band but I would say they sounded more like a pop group, and some of the bands classified as part of the 'heavy metal' genre could be said not to sound very heavy.


When I said 'The music from the UK in the mid-to-late seventies which is commonly called 'punk' in the popular media' I am of course only talking about that music which is referred to as 'punk' in the popular media, not every kind of music from that era in general! To the best of my knowledge, the popular media have never referred to the Nolans as punk. Perhaps it was the comma that confused the matter, but my post is accurate nonetheless -- it's one of the few things I know something about.

Also, the attitude is as important as the sound. In that respect the Buzzcocks were most definitely 'punk' . . . or at least what people like to call 'punk'.
"A man's work is nothing but this slow trek to rediscover, through the detours of art, those two or three great and simple images in whose presence his heart first opened."
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Re: Unintelligable Lyrics

Postby philipdalton on July 25th, 2012, 10:27 pm

According to Wikipedia, the first known use of the phrase 'punk rock' appeared in the Chicago Tribune on March 22, 1970, in which Ed Sanders, co-founder of New York's anarcho-prankster band The Fugs, referred to one of his solo albums as 'punk rock-redneck sentimentality'.
Iggy Pop was referred to as 'that Stooge punk' in the December 1970 issue of Creem, and Suicide's Alan Vega credits this usage as his duo's source of inspiration to bill its gigs as a 'punk mass' for the next two years. Dave Marsh was the first music critic to use the term, in the May 1971 issue of the same magazine. Later in 1971, in his fanzine Who Put the Bomp, Greg Shaw wrote about "what I have chosen to call 'punk rock' bands—white teenage hard rock of '64-66 (Standells, Kingsmen, Shadows of Knight, etc.)"
The term was also used in February 1973 by Terry Atkinson of the Los Angeles Times, who when reviewing the debut album by a hard rock band, Aerosmith, declared that it "achieves all that punk-rock bands strive for but most miss."
In May 1974, Los Angeles Times critic Robert Hilburn, when reviewing the second New York Dolls album, Too Much Too Soon, wrote, "I told ya the New York Dolls were the real thing", describing the album as "perhaps the best example of raw, thumb-your-nose-at-the-world, punk rock since the Rolling Stones' Exile on Main Street." Bassist Jeff Jensen of Boston's Real Kids reports of a show that year, "A reviewer for one of the free entertainment magazines of the time caught the act and gave us a great review, calling us a 'punk band.' ... We all sort of looked at each other and said, 'What's punk?'"
By 1975, 'punk' was being used to describe acts as diverse as the Patti Smith Group, the Bay City Rollers, and Bruce Springsteen. As the scene at New York's CBGB club attracted notice, a name was sought for the developing sound, which club owner Hilly Kristal referred to as "street rock". John Holmstrom credits Aquarian magazine with using the term punk "to describe what was going on at CBGBs".
By late 1976, bands such as the Ramones, in New York City, and the **** Pistols and The Clash, in London, were recognized as the vanguard of a new musical movement. The following year saw punk rock' spreading around the world, and becoming a major cultural phenomenon in the United Kingdom.
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