What was your first computer?

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What was your first computer?

Postby philipdalton on May 30th, 2013, 12:21 pm

I became interested in computers as a teenager and my parents bought me a Sinclair ZX Spectrum computer with 16 K of RAM which I later upgraded to 48K. Can anyone else remember their first computer?
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Re: What was your first computer?

Postby Betty on May 30th, 2013, 12:32 pm

When I was 11, my great grand father gave me his 486 because he didn't need it for work anymore. That was in 2001, so it was already a museum piece, but all the better for me because I needed it for programming anyway. I had so much fun with it writing code for old Turbo Pascal. I also remember playing the first Prince of Persia game. I had it all memorized from when I used to watch my father play it when I was a baby, so I finished it in no-time. I also used to use it to write stories, but I can't remember the name of the program I used. It was an interesting piece of software because it worked using different logic to modern word processors. I was surprised to see a friend of mine who is a book publisher use it now to prepare texts for publishing. He said it's much closer to the very expensive software used for books today than, say, MS Word. He still has to keep a 486 to run it, though. If only I remembered the name of the program. I think there was a number in it.
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Re: What was your first computer?

Postby philipdalton on May 30th, 2013, 1:03 pm

Did this computer use floppy disks to record software on? My Sinclair ZX Spectrum used cassette tapes.
Home computers have come on a long way since their humble beginnings, the first one to be put on the market was the Honeywell Kitchen Computer in 1969. It cost $10,000 (some websites say it cost $10,600) and there is no evidence that any of them were ever sold.
Funnily enough, the Internet actually originates from a network of computers started in the same year.
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Re: What was your first computer?

Postby Betty on May 30th, 2013, 1:12 pm

It used the big floppy discs that were actually floppy. But I also added a drive for the newer floppy discs. I also had a HUGE hard drive - 128 MB! I basically spent my youth cannibalizing other machines to give my 486 the best it could have. (For some reason, it didn't like a 1GB hard drive I managed to obtain later. It couldn't believe the size of it, I think.)
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Re: What was your first computer?

Postby tracy on May 30th, 2013, 3:11 pm

ive had my laptop over 6 or 7 years now and some times it plays up i was with broard band but now ive have a dongle which is better .i think soo i wil have to have a new laptop but not yet ;)
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Re: What was your first computer?

Postby kay on May 31st, 2013, 5:10 am

Back in the very early 80s, I was hired by Osborne/McGraw-Hill, a computer book company in the Bay Area, as a proofreader. I rose through the ranks, until two years later I was a project editor, responsible for as many as 40 books a year on things like C-64s, WordPerfect, Ataris, etc. It was old-style editing. One day they asked me casually to check a program line, only to discover I didn't even know how to turn a computer on. Lunchtimes for the next several months were lessons in humility as they all watched me work at it. Nonetheless, for years I could spout lines of folderol, logic, and magic that could solve my husband's computer problems, without even knowing what I was talking about.
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Re: What was your first computer?

Postby philipdalton on June 1st, 2013, 10:53 pm

Kay, you mentioned C-64's there, is that Commodore 64's?

I seem to remember my interest in computers being partly sparked off by seeing my old school friend's Commodore VIC-20 in action, that was the one they brought out prior to the 64 as far as I know.
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Re: What was your first computer?

Postby kay on June 2nd, 2013, 5:40 am

Yes, it was Commodore. I had an English major's attitude toward computers at the time, all pompous "this is going to ruin writing" and things like that; oh, wait, maybe it did? No, really, computers have changed the world in one of those giant shifts of zeitgeist, and I couldn't ever have imagined having the world at my fingertips like I do now. The company I was working for was founded by Adam Osborne, whose early personal computer first did well and then sank like a stone.
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Re: What was your first computer?

Postby philipdalton on June 2nd, 2013, 8:59 pm

I learned how to program in BASIC on my Sinclair ZX Spectrum computer and have also done a bit of Visual Basic programming on a PC. I was offered a home study course for £3800 but found a much cheaper one & did that instead. However, by the time I'd swotted it all up it was too late to take the exam, so I'm not doing any more of them.
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Re: What was your first computer?

Postby Graceful Leonard on June 12th, 2013, 4:24 pm

Mine was an Atari 1040 back in the days when they were ubiquitous in studios for music production. Oh, how cutting edge we considered ourselves back then.
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