Video nasties

Talk about the films you're seeing, programmes you're watching and books you're reading.

Moderator: Moderator

Re: Video nasties

Postby philipdalton on April 24th, 2013, 7:51 pm

What about Denmark? Over there film censorship was abolished for adults in 1969. Although there was still a rating system absolutely nothing was banned or cut and, although many people may find this difficult to believe, child pornography was legally allowed to be shown until 1980, although the production of it was an offence.

My father used to have some magazines he received regularly in the early 70's called 'The Book of Life', and in one of them there was an article on the Permissive Society. It did actually mention that there had been a drop in **** crimes in Denmark after film censorship had been abolished there, and this had been taken by some as an encouraging sign to show that readily available pornography was not necessarily harmful.
“Oh yeah, you really got me now, you've got me so I don't know what I'm doing"
philipdalton
 
Posts: 199
Joined: September 13th, 2010, 10:51 am
Location: Gallifrey

Re: Video nasties

Postby Betty on April 24th, 2013, 9:09 pm

I'm ready to believe that pornography can help reduce crime. Why deny people an outlet that doesn't harm anybody. I remember some researchers talking about producing child pornography without children - 100% digitally. That could be a solution.
"Once, I was a real turtle"
User avatar
Betty
 
Posts: 250
Joined: October 30th, 2012, 2:24 pm
Location: Prague

Re: Video nasties

Postby philipdalton on April 27th, 2013, 9:40 pm

Does anyone remember the old ratings in the cinema before it all got changed? They were U, A, AA and X. Does anyone remember what they all meant?
“Oh yeah, you really got me now, you've got me so I don't know what I'm doing"
philipdalton
 
Posts: 199
Joined: September 13th, 2010, 10:51 am
Location: Gallifrey

Re: Video nasties

Postby Graceful Leonard on April 30th, 2013, 4:00 pm

philipdalton wrote:Does anyone remember the old ratings in the cinema before it all got changed? They were U, A, AA and X. Does anyone remember what they all meant?


I can remember them as a child, but not the specific regulations, other than 'X' being 18 years and over. At school, everyone wanted to see the latest X rated film! I also heard an interview recently with a 70s British horror film director who said that they did everything possible to achieve an 18 rating back in the early days because it attracted more publicity. This is one of the reasons why film classification is quite often counter-productive.
"A man's work is nothing but this slow trek to rediscover, through the detours of art, those two or three great and simple images in whose presence his heart first opened."
User avatar
Graceful Leonard
 
Posts: 368
Joined: June 11th, 2010, 5:23 pm
Location: Cowering somewhere

Re: Video nasties

Postby philipdalton on April 30th, 2013, 4:49 pm

Censors are often unsure of how to rate a film. 'Alien' starring John Hurt was released in UK cinemas with an X-Rating in 1979 but the British Board of Film Censors didn't think think it to be particularly violent and had been toying with the idea of giving it an AA rating which would have meant it could be seen by younger teenagers.
“Oh yeah, you really got me now, you've got me so I don't know what I'm doing"
philipdalton
 
Posts: 199
Joined: September 13th, 2010, 10:51 am
Location: Gallifrey

Re: Video nasties

Postby Graceful Leonard on April 30th, 2013, 9:41 pm

philipdalton wrote:Censors are often unsure of how to rate a film. 'Alien' starring John Hurt was released in UK cinemas with an X-Rating in 1979 but the British Board of Film Censors didn't think think it to be particularly violent and had been toying with the idea of giving it an AA rating which would have meant it could be seen by younger teenagers.


I'd guess that the scene with the alien coming out of John Hurt was what made them consider the X rating. The rest is mainly suspense, rather than gore, as far as I recall.
"A man's work is nothing but this slow trek to rediscover, through the detours of art, those two or three great and simple images in whose presence his heart first opened."
User avatar
Graceful Leonard
 
Posts: 368
Joined: June 11th, 2010, 5:23 pm
Location: Cowering somewhere

Re: Video nasties

Postby philipdalton on April 30th, 2013, 10:53 pm

Alfred Hitchcock's 'Psycho' was released with an X-Rating in 1960 after the shower stabbing scene being very heavily cut. I think what particularly bothered the BBFC about it was that it seemed to eroticize violence by showing shots of the girl's bare breasts while she was being stabbed.

However, in the US it might have been shown completely uncut and to general audiences, as at that time they had no rating system.

I don't know if children were banned from seeing any films at all until their official rating system was introduced in 1968.
“Oh yeah, you really got me now, you've got me so I don't know what I'm doing"
philipdalton
 
Posts: 199
Joined: September 13th, 2010, 10:51 am
Location: Gallifrey

Re: Video nasties

Postby philipdalton on May 1st, 2013, 10:18 pm

In 'Taxi Driver' Robert DeNiro is shown walking into a cinema showing triple-X films. This was not a rating which was given to a film by any censor, it was self-applied by the makers of the film. The Motion Picture Association of America could given an X-rating to a film, but as the rating was not trademarked anyone could apply it to their own films, and some gave themselves a double-X or triple-X rating to emphasize that their work was very sexually explicit.
The MPAA do not give films X-Ratings anymore, they call it NC-17 (no children under 17, or 18 in some states) and this rating is trademarked so only they can give it to a film.
“Oh yeah, you really got me now, you've got me so I don't know what I'm doing"
philipdalton
 
Posts: 199
Joined: September 13th, 2010, 10:51 am
Location: Gallifrey

Re: Video nasties

Postby philipdalton on May 6th, 2013, 6:44 pm

In the 1950's most films were rated 'U', and there were only a very small number of X-Rated films. Many of these have since been released with a 'PG' on video. One such example is 'Invasion of the Body Snatchers', which was released in cinemas with an X-Rating in 1956 and was probably considered quite brutal for its time. In one scene people whose bodies have been taken over by alien pods are shown being stabbed with pitchforks to prevent the spread of an alien invasion.
“Oh yeah, you really got me now, you've got me so I don't know what I'm doing"
philipdalton
 
Posts: 199
Joined: September 13th, 2010, 10:51 am
Location: Gallifrey

Previous

Return to TV, Film, Books and Music

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

   
     
web design london : pedalo limited   Website and contents copyright © Tom Baker Ltd 2009 except where stated otherwise
cron